Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics) | Page 5 | TigerDroppings.com

Posted byMessage
BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
19459 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

Any tips on efficiency gains for Boo and I?


Not really. I don't believe i know anymore about brewing than y'all do. But i am very precise with my readings. I measure my mash temperature in about 6 diff spots before i close the lid. I had to add 3/4 of a gallon of boiling water to raise my temps to 152, and after 30 minutes my temps were still at 151/152.
I also sparge very slowly, and i'm constantly tinkering with the flow rate.
I also vorlauf about 10-12 times before i start sparging.

There is a possibility that my markings on my carboy are wrong, but i'll check on that before my next brew.



This post was edited on 2/25 at 2:52 pm


Back to top
BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
19459 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

Not really. I don't believe i know anymore about brewing than y'all do. But i am very precise with my readings. I measure my mash temperature in about 6 diff spots before i close the lid. I had to add 3/4 of a gallon of boiling water to raise my temps to 152, and after 30 minutes my temps were still at 151/152.
I also sparge very slowly, and i'm constantly tinkering with the flow rate.
I also vorlauf about 10-12 times before i start sparging.



Anyone else use beersmith when measuring efficiency? Seems like it matches up pretty well. I did a hand calculation the last 3 all-grain batches and i was pretty close.






Back to top
s14suspense
USA Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Mar 2007
11423 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

Anyone else use beersmith when measuring efficiency? Seems like it matches up pretty well. I did a hand calculation the last 3 all-grain batches and i was pretty close.



That's what I use.

Haven't compared it to anything else though.






Back to top
  Replies (0)
Fratastic423
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Feb 2007
5226 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

I don't know. I input my measured Pre-Boil gravity. I had to adjust my points based on the temperature at reading. It read at 1.042, but added .01 points to get a measured pre-boil gravity of 1.052. Put that into beersmith and my efficiency read at 83%. I then conducted my boil and all i gathered was 4.5 gallons. I don't know how, but thats what i got. and my target OG was 1.062 post boil. And that's exactly what i got.



How did you calculate that your recipe would give you 1062? Beersmith? What is your efficiency set to in the program? Bc unless your brewery efficiency is set to 60/65% you did not get 83% efficiency. You ended up a half gallon short (typically 10 pts a gallon), so lets call that 5 points. So your 5 gallon beer would have been 1057. Based on my calculations 1062 has you at 75% with your recipe which would make 1057 just shy of 70%.

Not knocking your brew at all, more just bored at work trying to figure stuff out.






Back to top
BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
19459 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

How did you calculate that your recipe would give you 1062? Beersmith?


Yeah

quote:

Not knocking your brew at all, more just bored at work trying to figure stuff out.


I understand. I believe it's set at 70-75, i'd have to check though






Back to top
  Replies (0)
BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
19459 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

Bc unless your brewery efficiency is set to 60/65% you did not get 83% efficiency.


The only thing i would object with, is my past brews, i've done hand calculations before, and i came up at 83%. But i was shy of 5 gallons. I'll play with brewsmith tonight and see what i'm getting. I don't believe i've ever set my efficiency on brewsmith. I'll see.






Back to top
  Replies (0)
swampdawg
Georgia Fan
Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Nov 2007
4714 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

How did you calculate that your recipe would give you 1062? Beersmith? What is your efficiency set to in the program? Bc unless your brewery efficiency is set to 60/65% you did not get 83% efficiency. You ended up a half gallon short (typically 10 pts a gallon), so lets call that 5 points. So your 5 gallon beer would have been 1057. Based on my calculations 1062 has you at 75% with your recipe which would make 1057 just shy of 70%.

Not knocking your brew at all, more just bored at work trying to figure stuff out.


Maybe he is stating mash efficiency vs. brewhouse efficiency?

Also, I have never done a temperature conversion for a gravity reading. I either chilled it or used a refractometer. Is gravity measurement not at 60 very reliable?






Back to top
BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
19459 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

mash efficiency


Mash efficiency is what i'm talking about. Measured with hydrometer just before the boil.

quote:

I have never done a temperature conversion for a gravity reading.


I have to do it, unless i want to wait on my beer to cool down before i boil the wort.






Back to top
Fratastic423
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Feb 2007
5226 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


If you are getting 83% that would mean that the beers OG was higher than it should be based on your recipe. In this beers case you were lower than your anticipated OG.





Back to top
BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
19459 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

If you are getting 83% that would mean that the beers OG was higher than it should be based on your recipe. In this beers case you were lower than your anticipated OG.


My mash efficiency was 83%. My brewhouse efficiency was 68%. When you guys talk percentages, are you talking brewhouse?






Back to top
BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
19459 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


Question with Dry Hopping:

I just tasted my pale ale yesterday. My FG is at 1.012. Giving my ABV at 6.3%. It tastes pretty damned incredible. I am going to dry hop and i'm curious at the suggestions.

I have .33 oz of citra pellets and .25 oz of cascade pellets and i have the following whole leaf hops.



I think i know the answer to this, but would whole leaf hops give any better flavors than pellet? I know that pellet is higher alpha acid, so i think i already know that you'll get stronger flavors from pellet hops. Also, of the hop varieties i have, what would you dry hop with?



This post was edited on 3/6 at 9:24 am


Back to top
LSUGrad00
LSU Fan
Member since Dec 2003
1303 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


I've dry hopped with both types of hops and had good results. The only real difference I found between the two was that I found the leaf hops sucked up more beer so there was less going into the keg afterwards.

of the varieties you posted I would probably dry hop with the Centennial, Columbus, and Citra.






Back to top
BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
19459 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

I would probably dry hop with the Centennial, Columbus, and Citra.


I may just pass on the whole leaf, and use the remaining .33 of citra and .25 of cascade






Back to top
  Replies (0)
Fratastic423
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Feb 2007
5226 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

I know that pellet is higher alpha acid,


You get more utilization out of pellets, the alpha acid % is the same. So unless you are boiling the hops the flavor will be the same. Alpha Acid % has little to no effect when dry hopping.






Back to top
  Replies (0)
Fratastic423
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Feb 2007
5226 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

My mash efficiency was 83%. My brewhouse efficiency was 68%. When you guys talk percentages, are you talking brewhouse?


To be honest I have no idea what the difference is?






Back to top
s14suspense
USA Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Mar 2007
11423 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

To be honest I have no idea what the difference is?


I think most people talk about mash efficiency when they talk about general efficiency.






Back to top
  Replies (0)
BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
19459 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

To be honest I have no idea what the difference is?


Mash efficiency is your pre-boil SG measured agaisnt percent of fermentable sugars from the grain. Basically, how well you extracted sugars from the grain.

Brewhouse efficiency takes into account mash eff + the effects of the post-boil wort. So since i was left with only 4.5 gallons instead of 5, i did not get a great brewhouse efficiency. It also takes into effect other things such as Pre ferm. OG, and other factors i'm not sure of. If i would have ended up with 5 gallons, i would have had a brewhouse eff of about 72%.

Basically Frat, it's what you were talking about earlier in the thread. My mash was conducted properly, i just had too much evaporation in my boil. I should have collected about .75 gallons more wort, which might have reduced my mash efficiency, but i don't know.



This post was edited on 3/6 at 10:37 am


Back to top
Fratastic423
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Feb 2007
5226 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

Mash efficiency is your pre-boil SG measured agaisnt percent of fermentable sugars from the grain. Basically, how well you extracted sugars from the grain.

Brewhouse efficiency takes into account mash eff + the effects of the post-boil wort. So since i was left with only 4.5 gallons instead of 5, i did not get a great brewhouse efficiency. It also takes into effect other things such as Pre ferm. OG, and other factors i'm not sure of. If i would have ended up with 5 gallons, i would have had a brewhouse eff of about 72%.

Basically Frat, it's what you were talking about earlier in the thread. My mash was conducted properly, i just had too much evaporation in my boil. I should have collected about .75 gallons more wort, which might have reduced my mash efficiency, but i don't know.


Calculating a brewhouse efficiency seems dumb to me. There is nothing to compare it to. You either get the appropriate amount of sugar out of your grain or you dont. If you end up with less wort but the right OG then you didnt pull out enough sugars. If you end up with 5 gallons but a higher OG then you pulled out more than you expected. It all goes back to your mash efficiency. The only thing the boil does is concentrate what you already have.






Back to top
s14suspense
USA Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Mar 2007
11423 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

You either get the appropriate amount of sugar out of your grain or you don't.


I tried to adjust for my inefficiencies the last batch we brewed by adding 1 lb extra base malt and STILL missed the gravity...

Didn't use 5.2 on that mash but I think I'm not getting the sparge water up high enough to get the grain bed up to 170. Beersmith doesn't account for that and only tells you to add x gals at 170 which DOES NOT get the grain bed up to 170.






Back to top
LSUGrad00
LSU Fan
Member since Dec 2003
1303 posts

re: Homebrewing: Brewing in process thread (with pics)


quote:

Calculating a brewhouse efficiency seems dumb to me


brewhouse efficiency is more important for commercial brewers than homebrewers.

brewhouse efficiency is the total potential of the grain used vs what ends up in the fermentation vessel. Your brewhouse efficiency takes into account both mash efficiency and loses of wort to equipment along the way to the fermentation vessel.

In a batch of commercial beer using 2000 lbs of grain; the difference between an efficiency 68% and 75% (arbitrary numbers) is about 140 lbs of grain...



This post was edited on 3/6 at 11:00 am


Back to top
  Replies (0)


Back to top