YouTube Pick Of The Day | Page 4 | TigerDroppings.com

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Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
Remember landscaping the Alamo
Member since Jul 2007
74432 posts

re: YouTube Pick Of The Day


(Watch this one ASAP -- it seldom stays up long. Yes, that's what she said)

An American Tragedy (1931)

A poor but ambitious young man is all set to marry a wealthy society girl when his working-class girlfriend turns up pregnant, and he comes to believe there is only one solution to his dilemma...




There was as much drama behind the scenes of this production as eventually got on the screen. Originally intended to be directed by no less a personage than Sergei Eisenstein (Potemkin), it was eventually helmed by the equally legendary Joseph Von Sternberg. Novelist Theodore Dreiser was so offended by alterations to his work that he actually sued Paramount Studios.

It would be nice to say a masterpiece resulted, but that's not quite true. The film tends to fall apart in the second half, and some moments in the courtroom section are downright silly. But there is enough moody atmosphere and crisp cinematography to make it a must-see, and IMHO superior to the later, bloated remake A Place In The Sun.











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Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
Remember landscaping the Alamo
Member since Jul 2007
74432 posts

re: YouTube Pick Of The Day


You may not have heard of Jack Chick, but you've probably seen his work:







Yes, he's the artist behind all those 3x5 religious tracts you've seen left at laundromats, park benches, and bus station waiting rooms.

Well, someone made a documentary about him , and it's on YouTube:

God's Cartoonist - The Comic Crusade Of Jack Chick







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Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
Remember landscaping the Alamo
Member since Jul 2007
74432 posts

re: YouTube Pick Of The Day


Charles Laughton directing The Night of the Hunter

For some reason, these outtakes from the classic Night of the Hunter were saved, and thus allow us to witness the great Laughton directing his cast. Mostly it's him directing the kids, but it also includes one of my favorite scenes -- Mitchum's agonized, animal-like scream as he realizes the children are getting away.

Laughton and Mitchum go over the script







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Tigris
Colorado Fan
In a van by the river.
Member since Jul 2005
6018 posts

re: YouTube Pick Of The Day


I haven't seen this thread before. Thanks, nice stuff.

A Show Called Fred is a great find. I've got copies of At Last the 1948 Show but had no idea that something line ASCF was out there, especially the coconut scene.

Thread is now bookmarked.






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Rodeonaut
Missouri Fan
Member since Nov 2013
810 posts

re: YouTube Pick Of The Day


bumped.





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Blue Velvet
Colorado State Fan
Apple butter toast is nice
Member since Nov 2009
17024 posts

re: YouTube Pick Of The Day


Had a good week for the oldies. Watched the following movies (each for the first time):

The Stranger (1946)
To Catch a Thief (1955) - a hitchcock I hadn't seen (gasp!)
High Noon (1952) -- don't understand the hype
Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978) -- re-make. Watched it while tripping on 'shrooms; terrifying.
The Killers (1946) -






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Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
Remember landscaping the Alamo
Member since Jul 2007
74432 posts

re: YouTube Pick Of The Day


How Animated Cartoons Are Made (1919)

quote:

Pioneering animator Wally Carlson "narrates" this silent short from 1919, How Animated Cartoons Are Made. The Chicago artist started working for John Randolph Bray, of the legendary Bray Studios, two years prior and developed some of his most famous characters there. In this video, we see Carlson at Bray, working at his desk, and taking us through the early animation process — which website Cartoon Research indicates is perhaps the most authentic look at how century-old cartoons were made.

Surely animators and artists will appreciate this video after seeing the ancient equipment and lengthy procedure Carlson endures — but he does so with gusto and old-timey charm.








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