Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread - Page 3 - TigerDroppings.com

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Burt Reynolds
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


Kafka = swag





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Kafka
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread








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Kafka
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread




Jack Palance singing "Blackjack County Chains" on the Porter Wagoner Show (1970)




































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Kafka
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


Joe Maphis - "Pickin' And Singin'"

In this rare TV clip of one song you can watch and hear the legendary session man shredding:

1. Double neck guitar
2. Fiddle
3. Mandolin
4. Banjo
5. Upright bass









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Nativebullet
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


I believe Kafka is a 1950-60's Disc Jockey stuck to "today's world."







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Kafka
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


Today I learned of the recent passing of Liverpool singer Jackie Lomax, one of the first acts signed to the Beatles' Apple label:

Jackie Lomax - "Sour Milk Sea"



quote:

"Sour Milk Sea" is a song written by George Harrison in early 1968 during the Beatles' stay in Rishikesh, India. It was given to Jackie Lomax to record and released as the latter's debut single on the then-new Apple Records label, in August 1968. "Sour Milk Sea" was among Apple's first batch of releases, another of which was the Beatles' "Hey Jude" single. The recording of "Sour Milk Sea" is notable for being the first of many extracurricular musical projects produced by Harrison, and a rarity among non-Beatles songs in that it features three members of the band. Along with Harrison, Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney, the backing musicians on the track were Eric Clapton and session pianist Nicky Hopkins.






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Kafka
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


When you think you've seen it all...

The Lawrence Welk Show - "One Toke Over The Line"

quote:

In one of its first seasons in syndication, the Lawrence Welk Show had one of its most surreal music performances.

Mike Brewer and Tom Shipley were a musical duo known as Brewer and Shipley. The men were folk singers known for their intricate guitar work.

Their biggest hit was a song called “One Toke Over the Line” in 1971.

The song’s title (and chorus) is a pretty explicit reference to drugs, as it is referring to taking a “toke” from a marijuana joint.

However, it is not like the whole song talks about drugs constantly – the line “one toke over the line” is the only time drugs are mentioned, so if you did not know that “toke” was a drug reference, which is very reasonable at the time for a certain segment of the population, then the rest of the song seems normal enough.

Here’s a sample verse…
quote:


One toke over the line, sweet Jesus, one toke over the line
Sittin’ downtown in a railway station, one toke over the line
Waitin’ for the train that goes home, sweet Mary
Hoping that the train is on time
Sittin’ downtown in a railway station, one toke over the line



See?

If you miss the “toke” reference, then the song just sounds like a normal pop song.

And that was what the producers of the Lawrence Welk Show were thinking when they had one of the recurring musical acts on the group, Gail and Dale, perform the tune on the show (referring to it as a modern day spiritual).

Reasonable mistake or not (or heck, perhaps a surreptitious joke by a Lawrence Welk staffer), it sure made for an utterly bizarre moment in Lawrence Welk Show history.




LINK






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Kafka
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


Now here is a fascinating historical document -- the recording of an actual telephone call between Buddy Holly and record company exec Paul Cohen:

March 28, 1957

Holly is calling long distance (a big deal in those days, especially for a struggling musician) from Lubbock to NYC asking Decca Records (now known as MCA) to let him rerecord songs he'd cut for the company a few months earlier, so he could cut them for another label. Cohen refuses to give an inch and insists Holly can't rerecord the songs for five years.

Note how unfailingly polite Holly is. Maybe manners were different then, or maybe Buddy was just a nice guy. I would've told Cohen GFY.

FWIW, Holly would eventually get around Cohen and Decca by rerecording the songs (one of which, "That'll Be The Day", would go to #1) under the name of his band, The Crickets. :likeaboss:







:crickets:






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Kafka
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


‘Inventing the American Guitar’ Explores 1840s Innovations (NY Times)

quote:

NAZARETH, Pa. — For guitar aficionados, a visit to the C. F. Martin & Company factory is akin to a religious experience. They talk in reverential tones about the handcrafted instruments that have been coming off the production floor here for more than 150 years, even referring to certain models in online discussion forums as “the Holy Grail” of the acoustic guitar.
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A new book due out on Tuesday, to be followed by a yearlong exhibition of Martin guitars at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, will surely add to that aura. The book, “Inventing the American Guitar,” argues that Christian Friedrich Martin, who founded the company in 1833, was not only a sublime craftsman and canny entrepreneur, but also a design and technology innovator of the first order, responsible for many features accepted today as standard on stringed instruments.

quote:

Up to now, collectors and researchers have tended to regard the period between World Wars I and II as the company’s golden era of innovation, not its first decades. Chris Martin, a great-great-great-grandson of the founder and the company’s chairman and chief executive, said in an interview here that the new book “has forced me to rethink our own history, and made me want to know more about those earliest years.”

quote:

The most important of those new influences, “Inventing the American Guitar” demonstrates, was Spanish. Most notably, Martin abandoned the Austro-German system of lateral bracing to reinforce and support the guitar soundboard in favor of Spanish-style fan bracing, which he then adapted into the X-bracing style that is the hallmark of Martin and other modern guitars.

“The most fundamental features, things that we take for granted in Martins, he wasn’t doing before he discovered Spanish guitars,” said Mr. Szego, an architect and collector. Adopting those techniques made Martin’s guitars “bigger, louder and more resonant than before that time,” in keeping with what an emerging American market wanted.


Sage entrepreneurship and exacting detail: a 10-string harp guitar by C. F. Martin from 1859-60:







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Kafka
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


Van Morrison - Blowin' My Contract



In 1967 Van Morrison was desperate to get out of his contract with Bang records, who weren't promoting him, or even paying him on time. So went into the studio and cut 31 improvised mini-songs, and delivered them to the label as his contractual obligation. (Yes, he went out with a Bang)

"The Big Royalty Check"

I'm waiting
For my royalty check to come
And it still hasn't come yet
It's about a year overdue

I guess it's coming from
The big royalty check in the sky
I waited and the mailman
Never dropped it in my letterbox
Oh, oh oh, oh

I guess it's a
Big royalty check in the sky
Ohh, baby
But you can't beat the tax man
And me all at once


"Ring Worm"

"Have a Danish"

Van has so much Celtic soul in him he can't help but make these ad-libbed GFY put-ons mystically swing. If you listen very closely, you can hear harbingers of Astral Weeks...









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VOR
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


quote:

Van has so much Celtic soul in him


Without a doubt. Aided and abetted, of course, by Irish whiskey and vodka.






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OldTigahFot
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


quote:

Aided and abetted, of course, by Irish whiskey and vodka.


And to think, he won't even allow alcohol to be sold at his concerts now.






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Tigris
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


quote:

"Ring Worm"


Awesome.

For some reason "I Like Traffic Lights" from Monty Python's Contractual Obligation Album comes to mind.






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oompaw
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


Nothing Rhymed - Gilbert O'Sullivan

And here's a couple of gems:

Until You - Terry Bradshaw

Ken Curtis - aka Festus






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oompaw
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


Jim Croce covering Gordon Lightfoot's Steel Rail Blues





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oompaw
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


Pamela Polland - Out of My Hands/Texas





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Kafka
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re: Kafka's Et cetera Et cetera Et cetera thread


Guitarist Randy Bachman Demystifies the Opening Chord of ‘A Hard Day’s Night’
quote:

You could call it the magical mystery chord. The opening clang of the Beatles’ 1964 hit, “A Hard Day’s Night,” is one of the most famous and distinctive sounds in rock and roll history, and yet for a long time no one could quite figure out what it was.

In this fascinating clip from the CBC radio show, Randy’s Vinyl Tap, the legendary Guess Who and Bachman-Turner Overdrive guitarist Randy Bachman unravels the mystery. The segment is from a special live performance, “Guitarology 101,” taped in front of an audience at the Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto back in January, 2010. As journalist Matthew McAndrew wrote, “the two-and-a-half hour event was as much an educational experience as it was a rock’n'roll concert.”
quote:

One highlight of the show was Bachman’s telling of his visit the previous year with Giles Martin, son of Beatles’ producer George Martin, at Abbey Road Studios. The younger Martin, who is now the official custodian of all the Beatles’ recordings, told Bachman he could listen to anything he wanted from the massive archive–anything at all.

Bachman chose to hear each track from the opening of “A Hard Day’s Night.” As it turns out, the sound is actually a combination of chords played simultaneously by George Harrison and John Lennon, along with a bass note by Paul McCartney. Bachman breaks it all down in an entertaining way in the audio clip above.












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