? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers | Page 2 | TigerDroppings.com

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Mike da Tigah
St. Denham Rougeville
Member since Feb 2005
41361 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


quote:

And I know this has been posted a hundred times but what's one more?


I found this comment telling

quote:

wallensteinSarasota A great article that strips the veneer off the "romance of war". That the Tigers ate up all life that grew, walked or crawled on Jamestown Island was no doubt occasioned by the pitiful effort the Confederacy made to provision its troops, and the rowdy Catholics were no doubt the last stop for the rebel supply wagons. That said, not resorting to cannibalism has got to count for something in their favor. I very much appreciated the story of the men lapping up the whiskey laced ditchwater like a pack of ravening dogs. Ah, tales of glory in war never cease to amaze; what an appropriate mascot for the Louisiana State University football team.









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Champagne
New Orleans Saints Fan
French and Spanish Empire Border
Member since Oct 2007
12540 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


quote:

No, it's not.


I don't get that impression from the OT, Zach. I don't agree that it is "inhabited by morons."

The OT often has goofy threads about nothing, but, more often, there are some very interesting and informative threads. My honest opinion is that military history threads really belong there.

I don't like to mix my enthusiasm for military history with politics. Political discussions can get nasty, among even the most reasonable people. Discussions about military history never get nasty among reasonable people.

Yes, I understand the relationship between military history and policy making. This was part of the curriculum at a military school for field grade officers that I completed a few years ago.

You might have misstated the relationship as "policy and politics", but, perhaps you can clarify what you mean by your question, quote:

"Do you understand the connection between policy and politics?"

And, also, if one understands the "connection between policy and politics", how does that impact the question of whether a non political discussion about military history belongs on the message board called "Political Talk" ?

Thanks.

PS Lee's Tigers is a great book.

PSS We will probably never have a History Board, so, I understand that History and Military History threads will have to go here or on the OT. I understand that there are some good reasons to put those threads here on PT, especially if one concludes that the OT is the domain of idiocy. The OT is not THAT bad, Zach.




This post was edited on 5/18 at 11:22 pm


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GREENHEAD22
LSU Fan
LafayettebywayofBush
Member since Nov 2009
8638 posts
 Online 

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


I had 4 ancestors that fought with them as well and another two the were in a scouting and sniper unit from the Bush, Waldheim area. Can't recall the name.







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braindeadboxer
LSU Fan
Utopia
Member since Nov 2011
5015 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


Well it appears that "Fightin Tigers" is a terribly insensitive nickname due to it being taken from a group of evil, racist, treasonist drunkards. It should be changed to the LSU Nutria Rats or something like that right?





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Champagne
New Orleans Saints Fan
French and Spanish Empire Border
Member since Oct 2007
12540 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


Yes, that is a legitimate issue for debate here on Political Talk.

Once the topic of Louisian Tigers is broached on the Political Talk board, the thread is politicized and open to comments suggesting that a name change would be the politically correct thing to do.

If we had a "History Talk" board, we could talk about all kinds of military history, and, when somebody tried to interject a political question into a thread on that board, we could say "Take your political issues, beefs and complaints over to the PT, and leave it out of History Talk."







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CSATiger
LSU Fan
The Battlefield
Member since Aug 2010
2973 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


quote:

The North and Western La. soldiers mostly fought around Shreveport, the Red River Campaign, and East Texas


Not so, the 9th and 12th La Inf.s were two of the largest and most distinguished units, and were mostly from N. La, the 9th was in the ANV and the 12th the AOT, both fought completely out of La.
The only units that pretty much stayed in La the whole time were the 28th, 31th and the Crescent regiment.






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CalBengal
LSU Fan
Austin, TX
Member since Sep 2003
661 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


CSATiger (or anyone else who knows): Do you have any information on the 17th La Infantry, particularly Company F, known as the Caddo Lake Boys?





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adavis
LSU Fan
Member since Aug 2007
3445 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


Terry Jones, a ULM Professor wrote that book. That's an awesome read. I thought this painting was from Shiloh or the Battle of the Wilderness... I could be wrong though. They ended up throwing rocks and sticks at the Union after they ran out of ammo.





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CSATiger
LSU Fan
The Battlefield
Member since Aug 2010
2973 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


Here is what Art Bergeron wrote about the 17th

"This regiment was organized at Camp Moore on September 29, 1861, with 832 men. From Camp Moore, the regiment went to New Orleans. As part of General Daniel Ruggles' brigade, the regiment occupied Camp Chalmette and later Camp Benjamin. The brigade went to Corinth, Mississippi, in February, 1862. On April 6 and 7, the men fought in the Battle of Shiloh. Ordered to Vicksburg in May, the men saw only picket duty during the first Union attack on that place, May 18-July 27. The regiment helped repulse the enemy attacks on Chickasaw Bluffs north of Vicksburg, December 26-29. Remaining near Vicksburg through the winter, the regiment was assigned to General William E. Baldwin's brigade. On May 1, 1863, the regiment fought in the Battle of Port Gibson and bore the brunt of the fighting during the Confederate retreat. The men fell back to Vicksburg and participated in the siege there, May 19-July 4. Paroled at the surrender of Vicksburg, the men returned to their homes. In January, 1864, the regiment reported to a parole camp near Shreveport for a short time. The men reassembled at Minden in May and soon went to Pineville. As part of General Allen Thomas's brigade, the regiment remained in garrison at Pineville until May, 1865. One report states that Company C was the only company in the regiment's division to remain on duty until discharged and that the company guarded the brigade's ammunition supply against the soldiers who were disbanding and going home."






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GREENHEAD22
LSU Fan
LafayettebywayofBush
Member since Nov 2009
8638 posts
 Online 

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


quote:

were in a scouting and sniper unit from the Bush, Waldheim area. Can't recall the name.



Any idea about this one? I was told the name some years back but have forgotten.






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CSATiger
LSU Fan
The Battlefield
Member since Aug 2010
2973 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


probably the 14th, known as Austin's Sharpshooters





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tigger1
Member since Mar 2005
2134 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


Austin's Sharpshooters was the 14th Battalion Louisiana volunteers.

It was formed from men of the 11th Louisiana volunteer Infantry, in the summer of 1862 when the 11th Louisiana was disbanded.

Only 25 men were left by the end of the war in 1865. Over 900 men appear on the rolls for the unit and held for the better part of the war less than 100 men. For the last year it had less than 40 men.

The unit had 3 companies under the command of Major John Austin.

In 1865 the men were formed into company H of the Chalmette Regiment.



This post was edited on 5/26 at 1:22 am


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faxis
LSU Fan
La.
Member since Oct 2007
7773 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


You are a seriously whiny bitch aren't you?





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Champagne
New Orleans Saints Fan
French and Spanish Empire Border
Member since Oct 2007
12540 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


Your Ma, whom you frick while your Dad watches, is a whiney bitch.

Now who is a whiney bitch, internet tough guy?



This post was edited on 5/26 at 8:29 am


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GumboPot
LSU Fan
Saints Fan
Member since Mar 2009
25778 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


quote:

12-0 or I bet they wanted to fire the commander






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GumboPot
LSU Fan
Saints Fan
Member since Mar 2009
25778 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


quote:

Zach


Cool thread.






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Zach
LSU Fan
Member since May 2005
65920 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


I got another question for experts. When I read about 'sharpshooters' did the long guns have rifling in the barrel or were the bores smooth? Seems like it would hard to be a sniper if you didn't have a rifled barrel to keep the projectile straight.





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jimbeaux82
LSU Fan
Natchitoches, La
Member since Oct 2008
1031 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


"Terry Jones, a ULM Professor wrote that book. That's an awesome read. I thought this painting was from Shiloh or the Battle of the Wilderness... I could be wrong though. They ended up throwing rocks and sticks at the Union after they ran out of ammo."

Throwing rocks and sticks at enemy - This is well documented and happened during the 2nd Battle of Bull Run, when the Tigers were fighting under Jackson.





This post was edited on 5/26 at 9:27 am


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GREENHEAD22
LSU Fan
LafayettebywayofBush
Member since Nov 2009
8638 posts
 Online 

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


Rifles barrels.





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jimbeaux82
LSU Fan
Natchitoches, La
Member since Oct 2008
1031 posts

re: ? for Civil War buffs ... La. Tigers


"I got another question for experts. When I read about 'sharpshooters' did the long guns have rifling in the barrel or were the bores smooth? Seems like it would hard to be a sniper if you didn't have a rifled barrel to keep the projectile straight."


By and large most of the rifles used after mid 1862 were rifled and the projectile used was called a "Minnie" ball, which had a hollowed lead base to facilitate faster loading (like a smooth bore) but would extrude upon firing to engage the rifling for greater range and accuracy.

Some of the Southern snipers were issued with a Whitworth Rifle, imported from England thru the blockade, which fired a hexagonal projectile which was considerably more accurate at long range. AS you can imagine, numbers were limited and competition was fierce to be issued one.






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