Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs | Page 3 | TigerDroppings.com

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Y.A. Tittle
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Member since Sep 2003
50123 posts

re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

They attach pro-lifers (i.e. - appeal to their voting base) in a more passive aggressive manner. See: Paul Ryan's sponsorship of the "fetus personhood" bill.


So, you completely mis-articulated your gripe?

Gotcha.






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TigerinATL
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
Member since Feb 2005
34477 posts
 Online 

re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

What is alarming for opponents of this type of system is the sheer number of adults whose lives depend on government assistance to some degree


What's alarming is we kind of need to shift towards socialism. Technology is in the process of outsourcing us all. Here's an article detailing how this has been a jobless recovery not because of Obama or politics, but because of technology. LINK

We've gone from everyone farming to 1% of the population farming. What do you do when technology does that to every segment of the economy in the coming decades and over 80% of the workforce is unemployed? The economy will still be able to produce the same amount or more, it just won't need many humans to make it happen.



This post was edited on 1/25 at 9:58 am


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Rohan2Reed
Grambling Fan
T'uela me la pela
Member since Nov 2003
72007 posts

re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

If we eliminated the US Navy's motto of "A Global Force for Good" alone we would immediately create millions of manufacturing jobs that would require engineers and tradesmen and salesmen and all sorts of jobs. This simple statement alone, a global force for good, allows Japan and Taiwan and Germany and France to forego substantial investments in national security and instead invest in manufacturing and heavy industry which keeps their citizens employed in high paying jobs that instill a sense of ownership and self worth that we will never arrive at with food stamps. The US Navy being marketed and utilized as a "Global Force for Good" is akin to fumbling at your opponents goal line and having them pick it up and returning it for a TD. It is a 14 point swing in their favor. Every penny we spend on Japanese national security by allowing them the freedom to utilize resources in other areas is a two penny swing in their favor. This is out problem and has been the problem with most empires, the biggest difference is that we do not steal the raw materials from our vanquished foes we set them up as trading partners.


I agree to an extent that policing the world is an idea of grandeur that limits our ability to spend money more prudently and end other people's dependence upon us while footing us with the bill.

There's one word that sums up the problem in almost every aspect of American governance: accountability.






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Politiceaux
LSU Fan
Member since Feb 2009
15632 posts

re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

I really don't care whether it changes or not. But I'm not interested in a politician making that issue a focal point of his campaign.
Meh, that's not an excuse for younger people voting for Obama this time. Romney was practically playing twister to avoid talking about gay marriage, abortion or birth control in the general. Anyone with a brain could see that wasn't in the top 100 items of his priority list.






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Rohan2Reed
Grambling Fan
T'uela me la pela
Member since Nov 2003
72007 posts

re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


Yes it seems so.





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SlowFlowPro
Stanford Fan
Simple Solutions to Complex Probs
Member since Jan 2004
300864 posts

re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

One could extrapolate that that makes it almost impossible for a candidate running on a platform of ridding our country of entitlement programs to succeed in getting elected.

basically

and not just for the number of people on the actual programs. add in these

1. family members who don't want to care for them
2. "feel good" people who believe it's their duty to support these people through government

it's a big number






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Rohan2Reed
Grambling Fan
T'uela me la pela
Member since Nov 2003
72007 posts

re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

Technology is in the process of outsourcing us all. Here's an article detailing how this has been a jobless recovery not because of Obama or politics, but because of technology. LINK

We've gone from everyone farming to 1% of the population farming. What do you do when technology does that to every segment of the economy in the coming decades and over 80% of the workforce is unemployed? The economy will still be able to produce the same amount or more, it just won't need many humans to make it happen.


Which is why we either need to back off of being such a consumer-based economy or embrace it and adjust our economic policy accordingly.

Here's a question I have about the entitlement programs and jobs: if government assistance were to end completely (extreme case, yes) but hypothetically let's say the draw down was 80% cut of benefits from welfare, food stamps and government housing assistance ... where would those people find work? And if they couldn't what would be the consequence.







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SlowFlowPro
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Simple Solutions to Complex Probs
Member since Jan 2004
300864 posts

re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

I consider myself slightly to the left of center on most things, but I will say that I am FOR defense spending. It creates jobs, produces opportunities for advancements in technology that benefit many industries and maintains our prominent stature in the world. What I'm not for is unnecessary combat.

i agree with this

i believe our military allows for international trade to proliferate. we benefit a great deal from international trade

wars? another thing all together. i mean frick wars...they're not even so bad. state building is terrible and expensive






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Rohan2Reed
Grambling Fan
T'uela me la pela
Member since Nov 2003
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re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

Meh, that's not an excuse for younger people voting for Obama this time. Romney was practically playing twister to avoid talking about gay marriage, abortion or birth control in the general. Anyone with a brain could see that wasn't in the top 100 items of his priority list.


You're talking about average Americans. Young ones no less. They need to be told what someone believes otherwise they're just going to delude themselves into thinking whatever the media, word of mouth, stand-up comedy, etc. tells them; in this case that Republicans = racists and bigots.






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TigerinATL
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
Member since Feb 2005
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re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

if they couldn't what would be the consequence.


I think one thing government assistance has done is lead to less reliance on family. I remember seeing some story on a tent city in California at the height of the housing bubble, and there were some idiot older couple who would rather live in a tent and take government assistance than move in with their children. They were fricking homeless and they turned to the government for help before their family






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SlowFlowPro
Stanford Fan
Simple Solutions to Complex Probs
Member since Jan 2004
300864 posts

re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

We don't produce anything of substance any longer.

bull shite. we're the world's #1 or 2 exporter of goods. we're the technological beacon of the world

are you calling trinkets and super basic assembly things of substance?

quote:

. If we eliminated the US Navy's motto of "A Global Force for Good" alone we would immediately create millions of manufacturing jobs that would require engineers and tradesmen and salesmen and all sorts of jobs. This simple statement alone, a global force for good, allows Japan and Taiwan and Germany and France to forego substantial investments in national security and instead invest in manufacturing and heavy industry

and we benefit by getting cheaper goods, which gives us more resources (time, energy, money) to invest in producing more advanced technologies and living at a higher standard of living






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SlowFlowPro
Stanford Fan
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re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

let's say the draw down was 80% cut of benefits from welfare, food stamps and government housing assistance ... where would those people find work?

that is certainly an issue, especially with a sudden cut

theoretically, once we stopped taking so much money out of the economy via taxes, we would spend that money on goods/services. that demand would create jobs for these people

the problem is our success has elevated our standard of living to a point that is not sustainable

we either have to take a step back in SOL or these people will have to move to other countries






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Rohan2Reed
Grambling Fan
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Member since Nov 2003
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re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


imagine ending entitlement programs and state building military endeavors. ton of money right there to use to balance the budget and move forward into this century with a sense of fairness (to taxpayers and to citizens of sovereign nations).





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SlowFlowPro
Stanford Fan
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Member since Jan 2004
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re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

imagine ending entitlement programs and state building military endeavors. ton of money right there to use to balance the budget and move forward into this century with a sense of fairness (to taxpayers and to citizens of sovereign nations).

it's going to have to happen. it just depends on if we want a collapse of our government/society or a shitty few decades of austerity

and i'll add that i'll support the military, but i do think we can scale it back a bit. getting out of nation building would save so much goddamn money. then we could cut back a bit and save a lot more






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germandawg
Member since Sep 2012
3422 posts

re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

Yet any liberal worth his salt will tell you that Defense spending is killing this country.

I would love to believe that the Rs in Congress will do something to stem the tide, but, alas, I hold out no hope as no one in a leadership position has either balls or spines.

We are so screwed it is truly terrifying.


Any Conservative with the mental acumen of a cumquat would also be of the opinion that military spending is a bad idea. Huge military budgets are not a tenet of true conservatism. They are transfer of wealth just the same as food stamps. The problem is two fold with defense spending. If you take part of my income and give it to my neighbor to buy food with the money goes into the economy in the United States. If you take that same dollar and spend it on the US Military in an attempt to provide the world with a "Global Force for Good" (The US Navy's current marketing slogan) then you relieve the rest of the Globe of the responsibility to help foot the bill for that "Global Force for Good" assuming that such a thing is necessary in the first place. It would be akin to you opening a shopping mall and not including the price of security in your lease rates. Your merchants would have an advantage over their competition who were paying that cost as a portion of their rent. If there were no physical barriers to prevent your merchants from moving the mall with the lower rent they would be a fool not to do so. That is what has happened to manufacturing in the United States. When you see companies willing to invest in China instead of the United States you have to realize that they are managing the risk of doing so by making certain that the US Military remains a viable force keeping China from nationalizing that investment. If it weren't for that risk mitigation, funded by US Taxpayers, there is no way that manufacturer could convince investors to do business in China instead of South Carolina.






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Rohan2Reed
Grambling Fan
T'uela me la pela
Member since Nov 2003
72007 posts

re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

I think one thing government assistance has done is lead to less reliance on family. I remember seeing some story on a tent city in California at the height of the housing bubble, and there were some idiot older couple who would rather live in a tent and take government assistance than move in with their children. They were fricking homeless and they turned to the government for help before their family


less reliance on families .. or the non-existence of families. both are major concerns. have to find a way to put an end to dead beats parents who don't give a shite about their childrens' well-being.

it's just an entire subset of people who are irresponsible in every facet of their life. these people are not accountable for ANYTHING. they expect the government to take care of them .. as if the U.S. owes them something.






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Rohan2Reed
Grambling Fan
T'uela me la pela
Member since Nov 2003
72007 posts

re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

theoretically, once we stopped taking so much money out of the economy via taxes, we would spend that money on goods/services. that demand would create jobs for these people

the problem is our success has elevated our standard of living to a point that is not sustainable

we either have to take a step back in SOL or these people will have to move to other countries


I think the solution is to find a way to increase foreign demand for goods we produce. That is the best way to bring us out of the consumer economy we live in. That or severely regulate the lines of credit people are able to establish to buy shite they don't need. Because I don't see us changing the mentality of Americans that equates perceived SOL with success.






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Diamondawg
Mississippi St. Fan
Mississippi
Member since Oct 2006
11454 posts

re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

wars? another thing all together. i mean frick wars...they're not even so bad. state building is terrible and expensive


Yeah - unless the war is on our homeland or at the Strait of Hormuz, I don't care anymore. We can't afford wars and someone else needs to defend human right around the globe. None of our business anymore.






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Taxing Authority
LSU Fan
Houston
Member since Feb 2010
23359 posts

re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

Over the 50-plus years since 1960, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, entitlement transfers—government payments of cash, goods and services to citizens—have been growing twice as fast as overall personal income.
Remember this little stat the next time someone talks about "stagnant middle class wages" and implies that "income disparity" is what's holding the "middle class" down.

It's not "the rich" not keeping you down. It's "the entitled".






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SlowFlowPro
Stanford Fan
Simple Solutions to Complex Probs
Member since Jan 2004
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re: Shocking statistics from the WSJ, re: entitlement programs


quote:

I think the solution is to find a way to increase foreign demand for goods we produce

we're the #1 or #2 exporter i thought

we just produce high-end things mostly, like technology. it's hard for non-skilled people to participate there







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