Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure? | TigerDroppings.com

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dawgfan1979
Georgia Fan
Red hills of Jawja
Member since Jul 2010
5754 posts

Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


I certainly hope not. As a casual fan I certainly hope it brings more attention to the states.

I grew up watching Prost, Senna, Mansell and Shumacher...I would love to see more coverage on ESPN and so forth.







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Keys Open Doors
Duke Fan
Member since Dec 2008
22651 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


I read a super condescending blog about F1 coming to the US and about how it was too sophisticated for American NASCAR fans.

I don't watch either, but what's the "sophistication" difference? Road courses with left and right turns versus just left turns on NASCAR tracks?






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dawgfan1979
Georgia Fan
Red hills of Jawja
Member since Jul 2010
5754 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


Those kind of comments usually coming from European fans piss me off...Just because its not that popular here doesn't mean we don't understand it!





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JohnnyKilroy
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
Member since Oct 2012
8298 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


quote:

I read a super condescending blog


Redundant.


And I can't wait to go to a race in austin. Hopefully it has decent success and stays around for a decent amount of time.






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225bred
Georgia Tech Fan
USA fan
Member since Jun 2011
4938 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


I definitely wish F1 racing would catch on here in the states, but I dont see it anytime soon. That being said: Ayrton Senna





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Keys Open Doors
Duke Fan
Member since Dec 2008
22651 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


Well I don't understand it but that's because I am not a gearhead at all. But I am trying to understand his reasoning for looking down on NASCAR fans, however ridiculous it may be.





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JohnnyKilroy
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
Member since Oct 2012
8298 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


quote:

Well I don't understand it but that's because I am not a gearhead at all. But I am trying to understand his reasoning for looking down on NASCAR fans, however ridiculous it may be.



To them:

Nascar = hillbillies driving heavy low-tech cars in a circle for 3+ hours






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dawgfan1979
Georgia Fan
Red hills of Jawja
Member since Jul 2010
5754 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


quote:

I am trying to understand his reasoning for looking down on NASCAR fans


I think Europeans look at F1 as gentleman's racing, while Nascar is more blue collar. While that maybe somewhat true, a typical american racing fan, with a little knowledge of race cars should have no trouble figuring out the concepts of massive downforce, KERS, and other things that are somewhat unique to F1.






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dawgfan1979
Georgia Fan
Red hills of Jawja
Member since Jul 2010
5754 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


quote:

Ayrton Senna


The Greatest ever

That Marlboro car was



Top gear segment



This post was edited on 11/14 at 1:31 am


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TouchedTheAxeIn82
California Fan
Bay Area
Member since Nov 2012
403 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


quote:

I read a super condescending blog about F1 coming to the US and about how it was too sophisticated for American NASCAR fans.

I don't watch either, but what's the "sophistication" difference? Road courses with left and right turns versus just left turns on NASCAR tracks?


Any discussion questioning whether F1 should come to the US is a COMPLETE joke. The schedule is determined completely by commercial interests, and by that I mean F1 doesn't care about attendance or local TV ratings, it's whoever is willing to pay Bernie Ecclestone's huge sanctioning fee to stage a race. F1 puts on races in places like China and Bahrain and Abu Dhabi (UAE) because the dictators want to increase their international "prestige" and visibility, so they pay the fee with no regard to whether the event makes money. In China I heard they actually put soldiers in the stands so they wouldn't look empty on TV.

In democratic capitalist countries, governments aren't going to pay the fee, so the local promoter is concerned about making money. So attendance counts, although I don't know if the promoter sees any TV money. I believe the F1 race in Indianapolis consistently had the highest attendance of any F1 race on the calendar. I went to the first Indy F1 race in 2000, where attendance on race day was something like 250,000, which I believe was the highest attendance of any F1 race in history. Yet the sanctioning fee is so high, promoters usually lose money, that's why F1 races are threatened (or no longer exist) at classic circuits like Silverstone, Spa, Hockenheim, Magny-Cours, and Imola.

As for "sophistication," are the race fans in Malaysia, Korea, China, Turkey, Abu Dhabi (UAE), Bahrain, or India more sophisticated about racing than Americans? Of course not, none of those countries have a history of motorsport. They just pay the fee to Bernie and they get a race.

So while Bernie doesn't care where F1 goes (he just wants to get paid his fee), the sponsors obviously do. The US is the biggest single market for many international companies that either sponsor or directly participate in F1. It amazes me that manufacturers like Ferrari and Mercedes have not been more insistent on having a USGP.

As for comparing F1 (or even IndyCar oval racing) with NASCAR, it's apples and oranges. The nature of the racing is completely different. The average F1 driver is far more skilled than the average NASCAR driver. You're more likely to see a good F1 driver learn to be a good oval racer than to take a NASCAR driver and see him succeed in open wheel cars (F1 or Indy). When racers successfully switch disciplines, it always goes in one direction: two wheels to four (e.g., John Surtees), and open wheel to tin top (many examples). However it must be noted that when open wheelers go to NASCAR they rarely dominate (except for "Smoke"). I have to admit, Juan Montoya has been a big disappointment. After several years in NASCAR he has done well on the two road courses, but has not done well on ovals, despite having previous oval experience and even winning the Indy 500.

While F1 commentators like to be snobs about the rednecks in NASCAR, the people running F1 have been paying attention to how NASCAR grew in popularity and attracted so many non-car-related sponsors. Bernie Ecclestone says a lot of stupid things publicly but he respects anyone who knows how to make money. NASCAR tailored the racing for the fans, who want to see passing and competitive races to the end, and F1 took a page from the playbook, first with KERS to try to facilitate more passing, but more successfully with DRS, which may be the most NASCAR-like innovation I've ever seen in F1.

I could go on and on, but this is getting ridiculous.






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dawgfan1979
Georgia Fan
Red hills of Jawja
Member since Jul 2010
5754 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


quote:

The schedule is determined completely by commercial interests, and by that I mean F1 doesn't care about attendance or local TV ratings,


I saw a documentary on youtube where Frank Williams said that F1 could care less about the fans at the races, just as long as the sponsors get shown to an international audience via TV.

quote:

As for "sophistication," are the race fans in Malaysia, Korea, China, Turkey, Abu Dhabi (UAE), Bahrain, or India more sophisticated about racing than Americans? Of course not, none of those countries have a history of motorsport

Excactly, your typical American race fan would have little trouble figuring out the so called "sophistication" of F1 racing. Hell my son understands it very well and he is only 10.






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SwatMitchell
LSU Fan
Austin, TX
Member since Jan 2005
1530 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


It sold out quickly and the secondary market ticket prices are holding up extremely well.

A 10 year contract is in place and the facilities are top notch. Austin does not have NASCAR - not sure if this matters...






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RuLSU
Rutgers Fan
New Jersey
Member since Nov 2007
939 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


quote:

I certainly hope not. As a casual fan I certainly hope it brings more attention to the states.

I grew up watching Prost, Senna, Mansell and Shumacher...I would love to see more coverage on ESPN and so forth.

I'm more then a casual fan, and I sincerely hope it works out in Austin. If it fails in Austin, the FOM might drop their plans for the NJ / NY race scheduled for 2014.

The idea of having an F1 race within an hour drive is, IMO, the coolest thing I could have ever hoped for.

* For those who don't know, there's supposed to be an F1 race in Northern NJ, with NYC as a backdrop.






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RuLSU
Rutgers Fan
New Jersey
Member since Nov 2007
939 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


quote:

I don't watch either, but what's the "sophistication" difference? Road courses with left and right turns versus just left turns on NASCAR tracks?

The difference may have existed 5+ years ago, but it doesn't anymore.

NASCAR fans are just as versed in pit strategy, tire management, fuel management etc as F1 fans are these days.

NASCAR has always had that level of sophistication in their approach to race management, it just wasn't talked about as openly or as often.

So, if some blog is being condescending, they do so out of ignorance for how race tactics are discussed during a NASCAR race.






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TigerStripes06
LSU Fan
SWLA
Member since Sep 2006
25016 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


quote:

Nascar = hillbillies driving heavy low-tech cars in a circle for 3+ hours


Despite the fact several of them have left the f1 for NASCAR and can't win.






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rickgrimes
LSU Fan
Member since Jan 2011
2999 posts

re: Is the Formula one race in Austin going to be another failure?


quote:

Any discussion questioning whether F1 should come to the US is a COMPLETE joke. The schedule is determined completely by commercial interests, and by that I mean F1 doesn't care about attendance or local TV ratings, it's whoever is willing to pay Bernie Ecclestone's huge sanctioning fee to stage a race. F1 puts on races in places like China and Bahrain and Abu Dhabi (UAE) because the dictators want to increase their international "prestige" and visibility, so they pay the fee with no regard to whether the event makes money. In China I heard they actually put soldiers in the stands so they wouldn't look empty on TV.

In democratic capitalist countries, governments aren't going to pay the fee, so the local promoter is concerned about making money. So attendance counts, although I don't know if the promoter sees any TV money. I believe the F1 race in Indianapolis consistently had the highest attendance of any F1 race on the calendar. I went to the first Indy F1 race in 2000, where attendance on race day was something like 250,000, which I believe was the highest attendance of any F1 race in history. Yet the sanctioning fee is so high, promoters usually lose money, that's why F1 races are threatened (or no longer exist) at classic circuits like Silverstone, Spa, Hockenheim, Magny-Cours, and Imola.

As for "sophistication," are the race fans in Malaysia, Korea, China, Turkey, Abu Dhabi (UAE), Bahrain, or India more sophisticated about racing than Americans? Of course not, none of those countries have a history of motorsport. They just pay the fee to Bernie and they get a race.

So while Bernie doesn't care where F1 goes (he just wants to get paid his fee), the sponsors obviously do. The US is the biggest single market for many international companies that either sponsor or directly participate in F1. It amazes me that manufacturers like Ferrari and Mercedes have not been more insistent on having a USGP.

As for comparing F1 (or even IndyCar oval racing) with NASCAR, it's apples and oranges. The nature of the racing is completely different. The average F1 driver is far more skilled than the average NASCAR driver. You're more likely to see a good F1 driver learn to be a good oval racer than to take a NASCAR driver and see him succeed in open wheel cars (F1 or Indy). When racers successfully switch disciplines, it always goes in one direction: two wheels to four (e.g., John Surtees), and open wheel to tin top (many examples). However it must be noted that when open wheelers go to NASCAR they rarely dominate (except for "Smoke"). I have to admit, Juan Montoya has been a big disappointment. After several years in NASCAR he has done well on the two road courses, but has not done well on ovals, despite having previous oval experience and even winning the Indy 500.

While F1 commentators like to be snobs about the rednecks in NASCAR, the people running F1 have been paying attention to how NASCAR grew in popularity and attracted so many non-car-related sponsors. Bernie Ecclestone says a lot of stupid things publicly but he respects anyone who knows how to make money. NASCAR tailored the racing for the fans, who want to see passing and competitive races to the end, and F1 took a page from the playbook, first with KERS to try to facilitate more passing, but more successfully with DRS, which may be the most NASCAR-like innovation I've ever seen in F1.

I could go on and on, but this is getting ridiculous.

As someone who has followed F1 racing for over a decade and understand the nuances of the sport, I agree with your post 100%. Great job.






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