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Kafka
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The Classical Music Thread


Leonard Bernstein's Young People's Concerts



quote:

Leonard Bernstein's Young People's Concerts with the New York Philharmonic stand among his greatest achievements. These televised programs introduced an entire generation to the joys of classical music.

Bernstein conducted his first Young People's Concert on January 18, 1958, just two weeks after becoming Music Director of the New York Philharmonic. Such programs were already a Philharmonic tradition when Bernstein arrived, but he made them a centerpiece of his work, part of what he described as his "educational mission." Looking back on the concerts years later, he referred to them as being "among my favorite, most highly prized activities of my life." When he took a sabbatical season from the orchestra in 1964-65, he still came back to lead the Young People's Concerts. He continued to lead these programs until 1972, even though he had stepped down as director of the Philharmonic in 1969.

Bernstein led a total of fifty-three Young People's Concerts during those fourteen years, and covered a broad range of subjects. The works of the great composers were explored, including tributes to modern masters such as Dmitri Shostakovich, Paul Hindemith, Gustav Holst, Aaron Copland and Charles Ives. Bernstein discussed "Jazz in the Concert Hall," "Folk Music in the Concert Hall," and "The Latin-American Spirit." He explained the intricacies of Music Theory in programs such as "Musical Atoms: A Study of Intervals" and "What is a Mode?" He broached complex aesthetic issues such as "What Does Music Mean?" (his first program) with clarity and without condescension. Bernstein also used the Young People's Concerts to introduce young performers to the musical world. The sixteen year-old pianist André Watts made his debut in the concert of January 15, 1963.


Bernstein Discusses Beethoven's 5th Symphony -- The most famous of Bernstein's TV's programs (actually done for the TV series Omnibus)





But my favorite has to be:

Leonard Bernstein sings "You Really Got Me"



This post was edited on 10/1 at 8:27 pm



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Kafka
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re: The Classical Music Thread


Two diametrically opposed views of an introduction to Opera (Washington Post)

quote:

Loving opera is such a simple thing. And yet the conventional wisdom seems to strive to make it complicated. Opera, and classical music, are elitist and arcane: This view is held both by people who don’t care for them, and by many of those who do. How many fans have you heard using words like “passaggio,” “portamento,” “tessitura,” as if to signal their insider knowledge? Even an innocuous mention of “Beethoven’s Op. 111,” which seems like a perfectly reasonable way to refer to that composer’s final piano sonata, earned me a snort of suppressed laughter from a non-specialist friend the other week during a discussion of whether classical music can ever really rock.

So how do people actually become fans of such off-putting stuff? If you look through a bookstore, you can find an entire literature of classical-music introductions and “Opera 101s,” most of it at least tacitly based on the idea that you need to grasp this specialized knowledge to enjoy, or even to partake of, this refined fare. Well, you need specialized knowledge to watch a baseball game, too, but people don’t generally seek out books called “An Introduction to Baseball” to understand what they’re supposed to be getting out of a game.








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Cdawg
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re: The Classical Music Thread




released in 1981, Hooked on Classics peaked at number 4 on the U.S. Billboard albums chart, remaining on the chart for 68 weeks. It was certified platinum.

Louis Clark, former arranger for Electric Light Orchestra, conducted the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra playing a collection of very recognizable extracts from classical music pieces played over a continuous beat (sometimes an overtly disco fast beat, sometimes a slower and more subtle rhythm, always produced by a LinnDrum) that linked the segments together. This is called the Symphonic Rock or Orchestrated Rock genre, like London Symphony Orchestra did in its Classic Rock series but with fewer electronic effects.

PArt 1, 2, & 3


Hooked On Classics (Parts 1 & 2) - 5:06
Piano Concerto no. 1 in B flat minor Op 23 / Tchaikovsky
Flight of the Bumblebee / Rimsky-Korsakov
Symphony no. 40 in G minor / Mozart
Rhapsody in Blue / Gershwin
Karelia Suite Op 11 / Sibelius
Symphony no. 5 in C minor Op 67 / Beethoven
Toccata in D minor / JS Bach
Serenade no. 13 in G major - 'Eine Kleine Nachtmusik' / Mozart
Symphony no. 9 in D minor Op 125 / Beethoven
Overture to William Tell / Rossini
Le nozze di Figaro / Mozart
Romeo & Juliet Fantasy Overture / Tchaikovsky
Trumpet Voluntary / Clarke (the listed title is a common misconception; the correct title is "Prince of Denmark's March")
Hallelujah Chorus / Handel
Piano Concerto in A minor Op 16 / Grieg
March of the Toreadors / Bizet
1812 Overture / Tchaikovsky



Hooked On Classics (Part 3) - 6:02
Wedding March / Mendelssohn
Radetzky March Op 228 / Johann Strauss I
Toccata Op 42/5 / Widor
Alla Hornpipe from 'Wassermusik' / Handel
Humoresque Op 101/7 / Dvorak
Lullaby / Brahms
Arrival of the Queen of Sheba / Handel
Promenade / Mussorgsky
In the Hall of the Mountain King - Grieg
Caprice no. 24 / Paganini
Ride of the Valkyries / Wagner
Fingal's Cave / Mendelssohn
Military March / Schubert
Polonaise in A major / Chopin
Symphony no. 4 in A major - 'Italian' 1st movement / Mendelssohn
Overture to the Light Cavalry / Suppé
Farandole / Bizet
Largo / Dvorak
Lohengrin, Prelude to Act 3 / Wagner



This post was edited on 10/2 at 3:10 pm


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LSU Red24
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re: The Classical Music Thread


Leopold. Stokowski.





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LSUTygerFan
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re: The Classical Music Thread


dammit...thought this said classic music thread..... n/m ... carry on.





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LaBornNRaised
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re: The Classical Music Thread


Love classical music. Great thread.





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Cdawg
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re: The Classical Music Thread


Frank Mills

Frank Mills (born June 27, 1942 in Toronto, Ontario), is a Canadian pianist and recording artist, best known for his solo instrumental hit "Music Box Dancer".

Mills released an album in 1974 that featured "Music Box Dancer", but it was not a hit initially. When he re-signed with Polydor Records Canada in 1978, the label released a new song as a single, with "Music Box Dancer" on the B-side. The single was sent to easy-listening stations in Canada, but a copy was sent in error to CFRA-AM, a pop station in Ottawa. The program director played the A-side and could not figure out why it had been sent to his station, so he played the B-side to see if the record was mistakenly marked. He liked "Music Box Dancer" and added it to his station's playlist, turning the record into a Canadian hit. Iconic Ottawa Valley radio personality Dave "50,000" Watts gave the record extensive airplay on the station. The album went gold in Canada, which prompted Polydor in the US to release the album and single.
In Nashville, news producer Bob Parker at WNGE-TV began playing the song over the closing credits of the newscast. Nashville DJs quickly latched on and both the single and album were hits. The million-selling Gold-certified single reached number 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the spring of 1979 as well as number 4 on the Billboard Easy Listening chart, while the album reached number 21 on the Billboard Top Album chart and also went gold. Polydor awarded a gold record to TV station WNGE for breaking the single in the U.S.
It was Mills' only U.S. Top 40 pop hit; the follow-up, another piano instrumental titled "Peter Piper", peaked at number 48 on the Billboard Hot 100 although it was a popular Top 10 hit on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart. Mills managed one final Adult Contemporary chart entry, "Happy Song", which peaked at number 41 at the beginning of 1981.

Music Box Dancer

The Peter Piper Theme

Happy Song











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ToplessTenors4evuh
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re: The Classical Music Thread


Gyorgy Ligeti, "Hungarian Rock"


This post was edited on 10/13 at 11:19 am


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matthew25
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re: The Classical Music Thread


Enjoyed the Peter Piper song. It would be good for a relaxing drive through the countryside.





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matthew25
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re: The Classical Music Thread


Must add: Fanfare for the Common Man, by
Copland.






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LuckySo-n-So
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re: The Classical Music Thread


quote:

Leonard Bernstein's Young People's Concerts


Back when A & E (The Arts & Entertainment Network) actually showed Arts on a regular basis, they would run these "Young People's Concerts".

Bernstein would be in the middle of explaining the nuances or history or inspiration of a particular score and the camera would cut to a shot of the kids in the audience.

They looked BORED OUT OF THEIR frickING GOURDS.

It was like their mom made them get up, put on their Sunday best, and do this on a SATURDAY! WTF Mom?! Poor bastards.



This post was edited on 10/14 at 9:09 am


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Kafka
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re: The Classical Music Thread


A History of Music in Seven Minutes

Pretty cool -- SIAP






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Walter White
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re: The Classical Music Thread


Burnstein's Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra is one of the best pieces of music that has ever graced my ears





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Ray Penpillage
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re: The Classical Music Thread


Light Cavalry





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Walter White
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re: The Classical Music Thread


Probably my favorite of all time.

Concerto in F major for 3 violins -Telemann






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MaroonWhite
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re: The Classical Music Thread


Beethoven Ninth Symphony, 2nd Movement. The first rock song.

Sergei Prokofiev - The Battle on the Ice from Alexander Nevsky.

Gustav Holst - Jupiter



This post was edited on 2/18 at 10:54 pm


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OldTigahFot
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re: The Classical Music Thread


One of my favorites. This one is like the telling of a sad, sad story:

Moonlight Sonata







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MaroonWhite
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re: The Classical Music Thread


quote:

One of my favorites. This one is like the telling of a sad, sad story: Moonlight Sonata


Agreed. You don't really want to listen to this piece unless you're in the right mood.






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ChoupiqueSacalait
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re: The Classical Music Thread


Amadeus turned me on to Mozart's Symphony #25 in G minor, 1st movement.

Love it. I think he was only 17 when he composed it.






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Kafka
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re: The Classical Music Thread


LINK


This post was edited on 3/2 at 2:52 am


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