The BART (San Francisco) Strike - Page 3 - TigerDroppings.com

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DawgfaninCa
Georgia Fan
San Francisco, California
Member since Sep 2012
3685 posts

re: The BART (San Francisco) Strike


quote:


I agree with the no skills part, you're income should be determined by your production, and more production requires skills.

I disagree about the GED part. I had to drop out of HS when I was 17 because my mother was sick and I needed to help support her and my sisters. I had to get a GED because I wanted to go to college, and going back to school and getting the required credits for graduation would have taken to long. Got the GED, took the required exams to enroll at UT, passed them with ease.


I spent 2 semesters there and decided to leave because I didn't want to go in debt for a degree I wasn't sure I needed. At the time I was a bartender, making barely $18,000/year. That was 11 years ago. Today I run my own company that employes 12 people full time, whose pay ranges from $50K-$175,000 per year. Not bad for a guy with a GED.


I'm not denying that someone with only a GED may be intelligent enough to start their own business and make a lot of money.

I'm saying someone who only has a GED and no skills should only get paid the minimum wage if they want a job working for someone else.

More power to you for what you were able to accomplish under your circumstances.








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kywildcatfanone
Kentucky Fan
Wildcat Country!
Member since Oct 2012
17416 posts

re: The BART (San Francisco) Strike


Typical union. They get paid way more than they are worth, but want more and more....





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Eurocat
Northwestern Fan
Member since Apr 2004
5100 posts

re: The BART (San Francisco) Strike


This article pretty much lays it all out.

The working man is not favored in this economy. Unions are critical.

QUOTE -

I was reminded of this scene from “Someplace Like America” while watching a new documentary film, “Two American Families,” which will air next Tuesday night, July 9th, on the PBS series “Frontline.”

The film, produced by Tom Casciato and Kathleen Hughes (friends of mine), and narrated by Bill Moyers, follows the lives of two families in Milwaukee, the Stanleys and the Neumanns—the former black, the latter white—over the past two decades, starting in 1991.

Both come out of the solid working class, and their fates are familiar ones. Jackie Stanley and Tony Neumann had factory jobs at the huge engine maker Briggs & Stratton, while Claude Stanley worked for A. O. Smith, a leading maker of chassis frames. All were union jobs, and all disappeared around 1990 as manufacturing went overseas.

That’s when we meet the Stanleys and the Neumanns—just as both families are beginning to sink. The only work the men can find pays half the factory wage, without benefits—Claude waterproofs basements, Tony retrains and works the overnight shift doing light manufacturing. Jackie Stanley tries to sell real estate; Terry Neumann gets into a cosmetics-selling scheme, works at a school cafeteria, then drives a forklift.

Without unions to support them, they are all at the mercy of indifferent employers and the harsh vagaries of the post-industrial economy.

The Stanley kids pick up odd jobs to help their parents. The Neumann kids start to struggle in school as their parents’ work lives leave a vacuum at home. There are never enough hours of work, or hours together at home, or dollars to pay the bills. Vacations disappear; health crises become disasters. The oldest Stanley boy, Keith, goes to college at Alabama State on a credit card. Neither family can get back to where they were before their economic slide began—a slide that coincides with those booming nineties.

This outline barely does justice to “Two American Families,” which will take its place among the central documents of our time. We all know the gist of the story, but its power lies in what we didn’t know, in the details of these American lives: Tony Neumann trying to hold back his tears at Sunday mass, the hardening of Terry Neumann’s features as she feeds a severely disabled boy in her care, Jackie Stanley’s sense of failure, Claude Stanley’s undaunted laugh even as his eyes flash with anger. The white family splits up; the black family stays together. Terry Neumann loses her house, which JPMorgan Chase sells at a fraction of the debt she owed on it. Of the eight kids between the two families, only Keith Stanley gets a four-year college degree, and with it a good job at city hall. The other children survive in varying degrees of dependency on their parents; some become parents themselves, too soon.

LINK







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Gray Tiger
LSU Fan
Prairieville, LA
Member since Jan 2004
22707 posts

re: The BART (San Francisco) Strike


I say give them what they want. If BART has to raise fares to cover the cost, let them do that too.





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Tiger Authority
LSU Fan
Member since Jul 2007
29475 posts

re: The BART (San Francisco) Strike


No worries, it's just unfunded liabilities that will invariably bankrupt California and force us to dole out the cash to save them. I didn't read the article but is BART a public or private union? Public unions are the bane of society.





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RogerTheShrubber
LSU Fan
Juneau, AK
Member since Jan 2009
91502 posts

re: The BART (San Francisco) Strike


quote:


Without unions to support them, they are all at the mercy of indifferent employers and the harsh vagaries of the post-industrial economy



Welcome to the world we all live in.







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Iona Fan Man
Iona Fan
Member since Jan 2006
27462 posts

re: The BART (San Francisco) Strike


quote:

The average BART worker makes $82K a year and pays a monthly flat fee of $90 for health coverage. I am unaware of the pension plans but I would imagine they are fairly generous.

Thoughts?


they should scrap the whole team and hire new from the pool of unemployed.



This post was edited on 7/5 at 4:24 pm


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notiger1997
Member since May 2009
23057 posts

re: The BART (San Francisco) Strike


quote:

the average joe has a helluva lot more difficult time in keeping his head above the water than before.


BS. The reason the average joe struggles so much in this country is because they are too stupid to manage their money properly. They assume everyone is entitled to 3,000sf homes, 60 inch tvs, new cars, smart phones, cable with all channels possible, season tickets to sports teams, and of course they have to eat out 5-10 meals a week.

I haven't had a raise in two years, but these folks are bitching that a 8% raise as well as a reduction in other pay check deductions.
Screw them. Their state and city is bankrupt, but never let a good chance to bitch and moan for more money get wasted. Yayyyy unions!!!



This post was edited on 7/5 at 6:34 pm


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ljhog
Arkansas Fan
Lake Jackson, Tx.
Member since Apr 2009
9926 posts

re: The BART (San Francisco) Strike


quote:

Thoughts?

hit the road Jack






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CtotheVrzrbck
Wisconsin Fan
Tulsey Town
Member since Dec 2007
22704 posts

re: The BART (San Francisco) Strike


quote:

I am willing to bet that most dont even live in San Fran proper.






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