Bloat and your dog
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Bloat and your dog
Posted by Pectus on 11/24 at 4:39 pm
*This is a serious thread and not a troll thread.

OBers,

I come to you today after a scare that came from when our prized retriever had to be rushed to the vet after exhibiting signs of bloat. By being aware she was acting differently and reacting swiftly, I was able to get her to the vet before anything serious could occur.

All you need to know about bloat

I had no idea what bloat was until I got her to the vet, but I could tell that my dog was acting strangely. 1) She was really lethargic, 2) her stomach seemed to be expanded out past the width of her rib cage, 3) she was drooling heavily, 4) she had unproductive bouts of throwing up, 5) she kept turning her head and looking at her side. From those signs I could tell she was in pain and had to act, I didn't care if it was just gas.

At the vet she was x-rayed right away to see if she had any rotation in her enlarged stomach. That's what bloat is, a dog gets too much air or food or water in its stomach, the stomach expands, and then the stomach rotates, which could cut off blood flow to vital organs below the stomach if not treated right away. It has the ability to kill dogs in a matter of hours. After the x-rays that showed some rotation, we rushed her to the emergency vet for another set of x-rays and surgery, if need be, to rotate the stomach back.

It turned out that while her stomach decompressed and some of the trapped air escaped, the stomach settled back to its original-safe position. Apparently there's an 80% chance that the stomach would become twisted though. That is why it's the second leading cause of dog deaths, especially in the larger breeds.

So, all this to say: Be wary of signs of bloat, you need to act on it otherwise you will lose your best friend.

For more information on symptoms, precautions, and hazards, check out the link at the top of the thread.

Take this knowledge and pass it around.

Thank you for your time.



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Posted by BRgetthenet on 11/24 at 4:46 pm to Pectus
quote:


*This is a serious thread and not a troll thread.

OBers,

I come to you today after a scare that came from when our prized retriever had to be rushed to the vet after exhibiting signs of bloat. By being aware she was acting differently and reacting swiftly, I was able to get her to the vet before anything serious could occur.

All you need to know about bloat

I had no idea what bloat was until I got her to the vet, but I could tell that my dog was acting strangely. 1) She was really lethargic, 2) her stomach seemed to be expanded out past the width of her rib cage, 3) she was drooling heavily, 4) she had unproductive bouts of throwing up, 5) she kept turning her head and looking at her side. From those signs I could tell she was in pain and had to act, I didn't care if it was just gas.

At the vet she was x-rayed right away to see if she had any rotation in her enlarged stomach. That's what bloat is, a dog gets too much air or food or water in its stomach, the stomach expands, and then the stomach rotates, which could cut off blood flow to vital organs below the stomach if not treated right away. It has the ability to kill dogs in a matter of hours. After the x-rays that showed some rotation, we rushed her to the emergency vet for another set of x-rays and surgery, if need be, to rotate the stomach back.

It turned out that while her stomach decompressed and some of the trapped air escaped, the stomach settled back to its original-safe position. Apparently there's an 80% chance that the stomach would become twisted though. That is why it's the second leading cause of dog deaths, especially in the larger breeds.

So, all this to say: Be wary of signs of bloat, you need to act on it otherwise you will lose your best friend.

For more information on symptoms, precautions, and hazards, check out the link at the top of the thread.

Take this knowledge and pass it around.

Thank you for your time.


Thank you.



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Posted by BarDTiger81 on 11/24 at 4:52 pm to Pectus
Glad you got her to the Vet in time. Sucks bad losing your dogs.


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Posted by BarDTiger81 on 11/24 at 4:54 pm to Pectus
Glad you got her to the Vet in time. Sucks bad losing your dogs.


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Posted by Nascar Fan on 11/24 at 4:57 pm to Pectus
Pectus
Finally a little advise from you that wasn't stupid



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Posted by Jim Rockford on 11/24 at 5:14 pm to Pectus
Glad you got help in time


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Posted by Geauxtiga on 11/24 at 5:17 pm to Pectus
Can you stick a needle in and release the air? I know when cows are on clover and bloat, you can- so I've been told.


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Posted by Biff Tannen on 11/24 at 5:19 pm to Pectus
I'm gonna wait till KR puts his 2cents in before I comment


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Posted by bapple on 11/24 at 5:20 pm to Geauxtiga
quote:

Can you stick a needle in and release the air? I know when cows are on clover and bloat, you can- so I've been told.


I don't know how effective this would be. Have you ever tried blowing air through a straw? It would take forever for the air to escape.

Glad to hear you and your buddy are alright. Well done on your part acting fast.



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Posted by Yeti on 11/24 at 5:27 pm to Pectus
Bloat and torsion are very serious issues for deep chested dogs. I'm getting my Great Danes stomach tacked when he gets old enough to hopefully prevent torsion. You're very lucky your dog survived


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Posted by CajunCowboy35 on 11/24 at 5:41 pm to Pectus
Wow that's scary

Thanks for the info



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Posted by Art Vandelay on 11/24 at 6:18 pm to CajunCowboy35
I always thought elevated food bowls was a prevention in larger breeds.

The more you know



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Posted by LouisianaChessie on 11/25 at 12:03 am to Art Vandelay
quote:

Too much food

Uh oh... Might need to keep an eye on this



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Posted by Cracker on 11/25 at 8:35 am to LouisianaChessie
I recognized it immediately told the surg what it was she was fine after the procedure.

READ THE SYMPTOMS THEN RE READ IT.

You can prevent it with a surgery that is only 400-800 bucks they go in and tack the stomach so it cannot flip much cheaper than the emergency surgery



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Posted by VernonPLSUfan on 11/25 at 9:42 am to Cracker
Never heard of that one.


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